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jenntalksnature:

One of my favorite skulls in my collection, this is a Reeves’ muntjac (Muntiacus reevesi).  I purchased this skull as is, I did not clean it myself.  The final photo is of a live, captive Reeves’ muntjac at a zoo.Muntjacs are relatively small, primitive deer that have fang-like “tusks” (downward pointing canines), and trust me, they are sharp, sharper than the canines on all the carnivore skulls I have.  They also have small antlers that sit on characteristically long pedicles (the permanent outgrowths of the skull’s frontal bone from which antlers grow).  Males typically fight with their tusks, rather than their antlers.There are 12 recognized species of muntjac deer, and one of the fascinating things about them as a group is their chromosome count.  Not only does the Indian muntjac (M. muntjak) have the smallest chromosome count of any mammal (males have a diploid number of 7 and females of 6 chromosomes), but the diploid number of chromosomes varies largely within the same genus; Reeves’ muntjacs have a diploid number of 46 chromosomes!  Because of this variation within the genus, muntjac genetics are widely studied.
I adore these deer!!
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jenntalksnature:

One of my favorite skulls in my collection, this is a Reeves’ muntjac (Muntiacus reevesi).  I purchased this skull as is, I did not clean it myself.  The final photo is of a live, captive Reeves’ muntjac at a zoo.Muntjacs are relatively small, primitive deer that have fang-like “tusks” (downward pointing canines), and trust me, they are sharp, sharper than the canines on all the carnivore skulls I have.  They also have small antlers that sit on characteristically long pedicles (the permanent outgrowths of the skull’s frontal bone from which antlers grow).  Males typically fight with their tusks, rather than their antlers.There are 12 recognized species of muntjac deer, and one of the fascinating things about them as a group is their chromosome count.  Not only does the Indian muntjac (M. muntjak) have the smallest chromosome count of any mammal (males have a diploid number of 7 and females of 6 chromosomes), but the diploid number of chromosomes varies largely within the same genus; Reeves’ muntjacs have a diploid number of 46 chromosomes!  Because of this variation within the genus, muntjac genetics are widely studied.
I adore these deer!!
Zoom Info
jenntalksnature:

One of my favorite skulls in my collection, this is a Reeves’ muntjac (Muntiacus reevesi).  I purchased this skull as is, I did not clean it myself.  The final photo is of a live, captive Reeves’ muntjac at a zoo.Muntjacs are relatively small, primitive deer that have fang-like “tusks” (downward pointing canines), and trust me, they are sharp, sharper than the canines on all the carnivore skulls I have.  They also have small antlers that sit on characteristically long pedicles (the permanent outgrowths of the skull’s frontal bone from which antlers grow).  Males typically fight with their tusks, rather than their antlers.There are 12 recognized species of muntjac deer, and one of the fascinating things about them as a group is their chromosome count.  Not only does the Indian muntjac (M. muntjak) have the smallest chromosome count of any mammal (males have a diploid number of 7 and females of 6 chromosomes), but the diploid number of chromosomes varies largely within the same genus; Reeves’ muntjacs have a diploid number of 46 chromosomes!  Because of this variation within the genus, muntjac genetics are widely studied.
I adore these deer!!
Zoom Info
jenntalksnature:

One of my favorite skulls in my collection, this is a Reeves’ muntjac (Muntiacus reevesi).  I purchased this skull as is, I did not clean it myself.  The final photo is of a live, captive Reeves’ muntjac at a zoo.Muntjacs are relatively small, primitive deer that have fang-like “tusks” (downward pointing canines), and trust me, they are sharp, sharper than the canines on all the carnivore skulls I have.  They also have small antlers that sit on characteristically long pedicles (the permanent outgrowths of the skull’s frontal bone from which antlers grow).  Males typically fight with their tusks, rather than their antlers.There are 12 recognized species of muntjac deer, and one of the fascinating things about them as a group is their chromosome count.  Not only does the Indian muntjac (M. muntjak) have the smallest chromosome count of any mammal (males have a diploid number of 7 and females of 6 chromosomes), but the diploid number of chromosomes varies largely within the same genus; Reeves’ muntjacs have a diploid number of 46 chromosomes!  Because of this variation within the genus, muntjac genetics are widely studied.
I adore these deer!!
Zoom Info
jenntalksnature:

One of my favorite skulls in my collection, this is a Reeves’ muntjac (Muntiacus reevesi).  I purchased this skull as is, I did not clean it myself.  The final photo is of a live, captive Reeves’ muntjac at a zoo.Muntjacs are relatively small, primitive deer that have fang-like “tusks” (downward pointing canines), and trust me, they are sharp, sharper than the canines on all the carnivore skulls I have.  They also have small antlers that sit on characteristically long pedicles (the permanent outgrowths of the skull’s frontal bone from which antlers grow).  Males typically fight with their tusks, rather than their antlers.There are 12 recognized species of muntjac deer, and one of the fascinating things about them as a group is their chromosome count.  Not only does the Indian muntjac (M. muntjak) have the smallest chromosome count of any mammal (males have a diploid number of 7 and females of 6 chromosomes), but the diploid number of chromosomes varies largely within the same genus; Reeves’ muntjacs have a diploid number of 46 chromosomes!  Because of this variation within the genus, muntjac genetics are widely studied.
I adore these deer!!
Zoom Info
jenntalksnature:

One of my favorite skulls in my collection, this is a Reeves’ muntjac (Muntiacus reevesi).  I purchased this skull as is, I did not clean it myself.  The final photo is of a live, captive Reeves’ muntjac at a zoo.Muntjacs are relatively small, primitive deer that have fang-like “tusks” (downward pointing canines), and trust me, they are sharp, sharper than the canines on all the carnivore skulls I have.  They also have small antlers that sit on characteristically long pedicles (the permanent outgrowths of the skull’s frontal bone from which antlers grow).  Males typically fight with their tusks, rather than their antlers.There are 12 recognized species of muntjac deer, and one of the fascinating things about them as a group is their chromosome count.  Not only does the Indian muntjac (M. muntjak) have the smallest chromosome count of any mammal (males have a diploid number of 7 and females of 6 chromosomes), but the diploid number of chromosomes varies largely within the same genus; Reeves’ muntjacs have a diploid number of 46 chromosomes!  Because of this variation within the genus, muntjac genetics are widely studied.
I adore these deer!!
Zoom Info
jenntalksnature:

One of my favorite skulls in my collection, this is a Reeves’ muntjac (Muntiacus reevesi).  I purchased this skull as is, I did not clean it myself.  The final photo is of a live, captive Reeves’ muntjac at a zoo.Muntjacs are relatively small, primitive deer that have fang-like “tusks” (downward pointing canines), and trust me, they are sharp, sharper than the canines on all the carnivore skulls I have.  They also have small antlers that sit on characteristically long pedicles (the permanent outgrowths of the skull’s frontal bone from which antlers grow).  Males typically fight with their tusks, rather than their antlers.There are 12 recognized species of muntjac deer, and one of the fascinating things about them as a group is their chromosome count.  Not only does the Indian muntjac (M. muntjak) have the smallest chromosome count of any mammal (males have a diploid number of 7 and females of 6 chromosomes), but the diploid number of chromosomes varies largely within the same genus; Reeves’ muntjacs have a diploid number of 46 chromosomes!  Because of this variation within the genus, muntjac genetics are widely studied.
I adore these deer!!
Zoom Info
jenntalksnature:

One of my favorite skulls in my collection, this is a Reeves’ muntjac (Muntiacus reevesi).  I purchased this skull as is, I did not clean it myself.  The final photo is of a live, captive Reeves’ muntjac at a zoo.Muntjacs are relatively small, primitive deer that have fang-like “tusks” (downward pointing canines), and trust me, they are sharp, sharper than the canines on all the carnivore skulls I have.  They also have small antlers that sit on characteristically long pedicles (the permanent outgrowths of the skull’s frontal bone from which antlers grow).  Males typically fight with their tusks, rather than their antlers.There are 12 recognized species of muntjac deer, and one of the fascinating things about them as a group is their chromosome count.  Not only does the Indian muntjac (M. muntjak) have the smallest chromosome count of any mammal (males have a diploid number of 7 and females of 6 chromosomes), but the diploid number of chromosomes varies largely within the same genus; Reeves’ muntjacs have a diploid number of 46 chromosomes!  Because of this variation within the genus, muntjac genetics are widely studied.
I adore these deer!!
Zoom Info

jenntalksnature:

One of my favorite skulls in my collection, this is a Reeves’ muntjac (Muntiacus reevesi).  I purchased this skull as is, I did not clean it myself.  The final photo is of a live, captive Reeves’ muntjac at a zoo.

Muntjacs are relatively small, primitive deer that have fang-like “tusks” (downward pointing canines), and trust me, they are sharp, sharper than the canines on all the carnivore skulls I have.  They also have small antlers that sit on characteristically long pedicles (the permanent outgrowths of the skull’s frontal bone from which antlers grow).  Males typically fight with their tusks, rather than their antlers.

There are 12 recognized species of muntjac deer, and one of the fascinating things about them as a group is their chromosome count.  Not only does the Indian muntjac (M. muntjak) have the smallest chromosome count of any mammal (males have a diploid number of 7 and females of 6 chromosomes), but the diploid number of chromosomes varies largely within the same genus; Reeves’ muntjacs have a diploid number of 46 chromosomes!  Because of this variation within the genus, muntjac genetics are widely studied.

I adore these deer!!

I was left unattended with a couple of belts and some old toys for like… an hour and a half. Just a little while.  But suddenly I have a holder for my pokeballs and pokedex.  I wish I had these skills and tools as a kid.I DON’T CARE IF I’M NOT TEN, GONNA GO START MY POKEMON ADVENTURE.
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Camera
CASIO COMPUTER CO.,LTD. EX-Z77
ISO
400
Aperture
f/4
Exposure
1/100th
Focal Length
10mm

I was left unattended with a couple of belts and some old toys for like… an hour and a half. Just a little while.  But suddenly I have a holder for my pokeballs and pokedex.  I wish I had these skills and tools as a kid.

I DON’T CARE IF I’M NOT TEN, GONNA GO START MY POKEMON ADVENTURE.

… Hey guys, I found Narnia. 

Today was kind of magical.  Things have been greening up for spring, and then, suddenly, we had a bunch of snow dumped on us.  For a couple of hours, there was this weird mix of green grass when ground warmth had melted off the snow, and frosted trees.  However, as the afternoon has warmed up, most of it has melted.

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQLqjO-AXxc&feature=youtu.be
Okay, so these are rather crudely executed, and the pattern still needs a little tweaking, but, given that these are both the most complex leather items I’ve made yet, and they’re my first attempt at any sort of gauntlet, I’m rather pleased with them.  
I’ve seen some similar clawed gauntlets at a local con that I attend, but they didn’t allow for much hand movement, were very clunky and heavy, and had no thumb claw at all, so, I designed a gauntlet that I felt was comfortable, allowed me to retain my fine motor skills and a good grip, and then stuck claws on it.
So Yeah.  Claw Gauntlets.  Clauntlets, perhaps. My coworker calls the Murder Gloves.  Oooh,  Taloned Gauntlets, that sounds good…
Zoom Info
Camera
CASIO COMPUTER CO.,LTD. EX-Z77
ISO
50
Aperture
f/5
Exposure
1/160th
Focal Length
14mm

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQLqjO-AXxc&feature=youtu.be

Okay, so these are rather crudely executed, and the pattern still needs a little tweaking, but, given that these are both the most complex leather items I’ve made yet, and they’re my first attempt at any sort of gauntlet, I’m rather pleased with them. 

I’ve seen some similar clawed gauntlets at a local con that I attend, but they didn’t allow for much hand movement, were very clunky and heavy, and had no thumb claw at all, so, I designed a gauntlet that I felt was comfortable, allowed me to retain my fine motor skills and a good grip, and then stuck claws on it.


So Yeah.  Claw Gauntlets.  Clauntlets, perhaps. My coworker calls the Murder Gloves.  Oooh,  Taloned Gauntlets, that sounds good…

shade-rartblog:

ursulavernon:

nevver:

Monsters, by State

…poop monster. Colorado gets a freakin’ tourist eating mountain whale, and my state gets a poop monster.

Sure. Why not.

FROG MAN???

WHY HAVE I NEVER HEARD OF THE LOVELAND FROG MAN????

Oh sure I’ve heard all about the grassman but WHAT IS THIS FROG MAN YOU SPEAK OF

NAAAASSSSHHHH??

WHY HAVE I NOT TOLD YOU ABOUT THE LOVELAND FROGMAN?  I HAVE FAILED YOU AS A FRIEND.  I have a little story about the Loveland Frogman that I’ll have to tall ya sometime, Shade.

But I digress!  About the Frogman.  It’s kind of awesome.  It’s way cooler than the Grassman and it predates my beloved Werewolf of Defiance, with the first Frogman sighting recorded in 1955, though some speculate that the creature is in fact the Shawnahooc, a river demon of Shawnee legend.

Naturally, they tend to be seen around water, and are often seen under or around bridges.  Some sources report them as holding some sort of rod that sparks at the end.  If I recall correctly, they’re generally about 4-5 feet tall, covered in green, leathery skin, sporting a froglike head, as well as webbed hands and feet. 

However, what really makes this stand out is the credibility of its first witnesses: a business man and later, two police officers, all of whom had something to lose for believing in something like anthrpomorphic frogs.

Obviously, Shade, we need to grab the gang, have a daytrip to Loveland Castle, and look for frogmen in the river there.

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